What Does Nutshell Stand For?

What does the idiom spill the beans mean?

Disclose a secret or reveal something prematurely, as in You can count on little Carol to spill the beans about the surprise.

In this colloquial expression, first recorded in 1919, spill means “divulge,” a usage dating from the 1500s..

How do you use nutshell in a sentence?

This means that you want to describe something / tell a story in brief. You want to give a summary.“I won’t tell you the whole story, but in a nutshell…”“Can you tell me in a nutshell?”“In a nutshell, the problem is that we had to move out of that office.”

What is the meaning of my life in a nutshell?

“life in a nutshell” basically is used to describe a commonly occurring theme in someone’s life. In a sentence: “Bad luck…my life in a nutshell!” “life in a nutshell” basically is used to describe a commonly occurring theme in someone’s life. In a sentence: “Bad luck…my life in a nutshell!” See a translation.

Is as well as formal?

“Too” is the most informal but is often the best choice when speaking American English. “As well” is a little more formal than “too” and less common in American spoken English. Many Americans do use it in writing, however. “Also” is generally more common in writing than speech.

Is lots of formal or informal?

They can be placed before singular or plural countable and uncountable nouns. Although lots and plenty are acceptable in academic writing, their usage is considered to be informal. In formal academic writing, it is more appropriate to use many, much, and more.

Where does the saying in a nutshell come from?

Usage of the phrase in a nutshell was first seen around 77 A.D. in the work Natural History by Pliny the Elder: “Cicero hath recorded, that the poem of Homer called the Iliad, written on parchment, was enclosed within a nutshell.” In this instance, the phrase within a nutshell was used to illustrate something that …

Are you kidding meaning?

Definition of are you kidding (me) —used when someone says something surprising or that seems as if it could not be serious or true”The test is tomorrow.” “Are you kidding (me)?!” “It’s true.

Is Besides a formal word?

It means ‘at the side of’ or ‘next to’. It is rather formal: … Besides is a preposition or a linking adverb.

What does by the skin of his teeth mean?

If you do something by the skin of your teeth, you only just succeed in doing it: He escaped from the secret police by the skin of his teeth. Expressions used to describe situations.

What does it mean to hit below the belt?

To say something that is often too personal, usually irrelevant, and always unfair: “To remind reformed alcoholics of their drinking problem is to hit below the belt.” The expression comes from boxing, in which it is illegal to hit an opponent below the belt.

What is the meaning of concise?

expressing or covering much in few words; brief in form but comprehensive in scope; succinct; terse: a concise explanation of the company’s retirement plan.

What does it mean to say in a nutshell?

Use the phrase in a nutshell when you want to make it clear that you’re going to sum something up in just a few words. Another way to say this would be “to make a long story short.”

Is in a nutshell an idiom?

The idiom in a nutshell is meant to indicate that someone is expressing something in as simple a way as possible, using the fewest words possible; a concise and brief summary. Ayto, John.

Is in a nutshell formal?

The following list will help you to recognize the informal and formal ways of saying the same thing….Transitions – Informal & Formal.InformalFormalIn the end,FinallyTo sum upIn conclusion,In a nutshell/BasicallyTo summarize,Anyway,Notwithstanding32 more rows

What does the idiom a red herring mean?

A red herring is something that misleads or distracts from a relevant or important question. It may be either a logical fallacy or a literary device that leads readers or audiences toward a false conclusion.

What does the idiom lion’s share mean?

The lion’s share is an idiomatic expression which refers to the major share of something. … The phrase derives from the plot of a number of fables ascribed to Aesop and is used here as their generic title.

What is the meaning of the idiom to make both ends meet?

The English idiom was originally ‘make both ends meet’, both ends meaning the beginning and end of the year. Therefore, we started using it to mean that we have enough money to buy everything we need for the whole year. Now we use it to mean that we have enough money in general. Examples.

What is the meaning of don’t put the cart before the horse?

A cart is a vehicle which is ordinarily pulled by a horse, so to put the cart before the horse is an analogy for doing things in the wrong order. The figure of speech means doing things the wrong way round or with the wrong emphasis. The idiom is about confusing cause and effect.