Question: How Bad Can A Sinus Infection Get?

How bad can a sinus infection make you feel?

Pain in your sinuses Any of these can hurt when you have a sinus infection.

Inflammation and swelling cause your sinuses to ache with a dull pressure.

You may feel pain in your forehead, on either side of your nose, in your upper jaws and teeth, or between your eyes.

This may lead to a headache..

How long do sinus infections last?

An “acute” sinus infection lasts anywhere from ten days up to eight weeks. A “chronic” infection lasts even longer. It is ongoing — it may seem like it’s improving, and then it comes right back as bad as it was at first. Chronic sinus infections may drag on for months at a time.

Why won’t my sinus infection go away with antibiotics?

If your sinus infection just won’t go away or keeps coming back, it may be time to see an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist. An ENT treats conditions of the ear, nose, throat, head, face, and neck. It may be time to see an ENT if: … Your doctor suspects nasal polyps or another blockage of the nasal cavity.

Is VapoRub good for sinus infection?

Vicks VapoRub If you have a persistent cough courtesy of your sinus infection, this trick is proven to help relieve coughing throughout the night! It’s worth a try. You can also rub some Vicks underneath your nose to relieve a headache.

What happens if you let a sinus infection go untreated?

In rare cases, untreated sinusitis can lead to meningitis, a brain abscess, or an infection of the bone. Talk to your doctor about your concerns.

When should I go to the doctor for a sinus infection?

When to see your doctor for sinus infection Make an appointment with your doctor if you have a fever, nasal discharge, congestion, or facial pain that lasts longer than ten days or keeps coming back. … A fever is not a typical symptom of either chronic or acute sinusitis, but it is possible.

Do I need antibiotics for sinus infection?

Antibiotics are not needed for many sinus infections. Most sinus infections usually get better on their own without antibiotics. … If your child doesn’t feel better after 2–3 days of rest, extra fluids, and pain relievers, the doctor may write a prescription for an antibiotic.

What is the best over the counter medicine for a sinus infection?

The 5 Best Over-the-Counter Medicines for Sinus InfectionsNasal steroids. amazon.com. These are nasal sprays like Flonase, Veramyst, Rhinocort, and Nasonex. … Decongestants. walmart.com. Decongestants are medications that reduce swelling and inflammation by narrowing your blood vessels. … Pain relievers. amazon.com. … Mucolytics. walmart.com. … Antihistamines. amazon.com.

What color mucus is bad?

What Does the Color of Mucus Mean? Cloudy or white mucus is a sign of a cold. Yellow or green mucus is a sign of a bacterial infection. Brown or orange mucus is sign of dried red blood cells and inflammation (aka a dry nose).

What is the fastest way to get rid of a sinus infection?

Here are the top 10 at-home treatments to help ease your sinus pain and inflammation to get rid of your sinus infection faster.Flush. Use a Neti pot, a therapy that uses a salt and water solution, to flush your nasal passages. … Spray. … Hydrate. … Rest. … Steam. … Spice. … Add humidity. … OTC medication.More items…•

How do I know if my sinus infection is bacterial or viral?

Most sinus infections are viral, and most are caused by the virus that causes the common cold. How can you tell, based on symptoms, whether your infection is viral or bacterial? Normally, you can’t. Symptoms like bad breath, yellow or green mucus, fever and headache are not reliable signs of a bacterial infection.

Will sinus infection clear on its own?

Will my sinus infection clear up on its own? The first few weeks of the common cold aren’t fun, but the acute sinusitis that can pop up afterwards doesn’t help either. Sinus congestion and the common cold, unfortunately, go hand in hand. … About 70 percent of sinus infections go away within two weeks without antibiotics.

Should I go to work with a sinus infection?

The only time you should definitely not go to work with a sinus infection is if you also have a fever. This may be a sign of something more contagious, as it isn’t very common with a sinus infection alone. If you’re suffering from a fever, do yourself (and your co-workers) a favor, and stay home to recover.

Can you smell a sinus infection?

Acute or chronic sinusitis Sinusitis causes symptoms such as sinus inflammation and nasal congestion, which can interfere with a person’s sense of smell. The condition can also cause bad breath and a discolored, bad-smelling discharge in the nose and back of the throat, all of which may create a bad smell in the nose.

What is the best antibiotic for sinus infection?

Amoxicillin (Amoxil) is acceptable for uncomplicated acute sinus infections; however, many doctors prescribe amoxicillin-clavulanate (Augmentin) as the first-line antibiotic to treat a possible bacterial infection of the sinuses. Amoxicillin usually is effective against most of the strains of bacteria.

What should I eat if I have a sinus infection?

To help you turn your pantry into a medicine cabinet, try stocking up on healthy food for sinus problems :Fish and Seafood. Not only are fish chock-full of high quality protein, many types also contain omega-3 fatty acids. … Dark Leafy Greens. … Hot Peppers. … Honey. … Garlic.

What color is your mucus when you have a sinus infection?

When you have a cold, your immune system sends white blood cells called neutrophils rushing to the area. These cells contain a greenish-colored enzyme, and in large numbers they can turn the mucus the same color. But “you can have perfectly clear mucus and have a terrible ear and sinus infection,” Kao says.

How doctors tell if you have a sinus infection?

Sinus infection is most often diagnosed based on the history and examination of a doctor. … purulent (pus like) drainage from the nasal passages (the symptom most likely to clinically diagnose a sinus infection), tenderness to percussion (tapping) over the cheeks or forehead region of the sinuses, and.