Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions

Zantac Tablets 300mg – Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) – (emc)

Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions

This information is intended for use by health professionals

Each tablet contains ranitidine 300 mg (as the hydrochloride).

For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

Adults

Zantac Tablets are indicated for:

• treatment of duodenal ulcer and benign gastric ulcer, including that associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

• treatment of duodenal ulcers associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

• treatment of post-operative ulcer

• Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

• oesophageal reflux disease

• chronic episodic dyspepsia, characterised by pain (epigastric or retrosternal) which is related to meals or disturbs sleep but is not associated with the preceding conditions may benefit from ranitidine treatment.

Zantac Tablets are indicated for the following conditions where reduction of gastric secretion and acid output is desirable:

• prophylaxis of gastrointestinal haemorrhage from stress ulceration in seriously ill patients

• prophylaxis of recurrent haemorrhage in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers

• before general anaesthesia in patients considered to be at risk of acid aspiration (Mendelson's syndrome), particularly obstetric patients during labour.

For appropriate cases Zantac Injection is also available (see separate SPC).

Children (3 to 18 years)

Short term treatment of peptic ulcer

Treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux, including reflux oesophagitis and symptomatic relief of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

Posology

Adults (including the elderly)

The usual dosage is 150 mg twice daily, taken in the morning and evening.

Patients with duodenal ulceration, gastric ulceration or oesophageal reflux disease may be treated with a single bedtime dose of 300 mg. It is not necessary to time the dose in relation to meals.

Duodenal ulcer, benign gastric ulcer and post operative ulcer:

In most cases of duodenal ulcer, benign gastric ulcer and post operative ulcer, healing occurs in four weeks. Healing usually occurs after a further four weeks of treatment in those patients whose ulcers have not fully healed after the initial course of therapy.

NSAID associated peptic ulceration, including prophylaxis of duodenal ulcers:

In ulcers following non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy or associated with continued non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, eight weeks treatment may be necessary.

In duodenal ulcer 300 mg twice daily for 4 weeks results in healing rates which are higher than those at 4 weeks with ranitidine 150 mg twice daily or 300 mg nocte. The increased dose has not been associated with an increased incidence of unwanted effects.

Duodenal ulcers associated with Helicobacterpylori infection:

For duodenal ulcers associated with Helicobacter pylori infection ranitidine 300 mg at bedtime or 150 mg twice daily may be given with oral amoxicillin 750 mg three times daily and metronidazole 500 mg three times daily for two weeks. Therapy with ranitidine should continue for a further 2 weeks. This dose regimen significantly reduces the frequency of duodenal ulcer recurrence.

Maintenance treatment at a reduced dosage of 150 mg at bedtime is recommended for patients who have responded to short-term therapy, particularly those with a history of recurrent ulcer.

Oesophageal reflux disease

In the management of oesophageal reflux disease, the recommended course of treatment is either 150 mg twice daily or 300 mg at bedtime for up to 8 weeks or if necessary 12 weeks.

In patients with moderate to severe oesophagitis, the dosage of ranitidine may be increased to 150 mg 4 times daily for up to 12 weeks.

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome:

In patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, the starting dose is 150 mg three times daily and this may be increased as necessary. Patients with this syndrome have been given increasing doses up to 6 g per day and these doses have been well tolerated.

Chronic episodic dyspepsia:

For patients with chronic episodic dyspepsia the recommended course of treatment is 150 mg twice daily for up to six weeks. Anyone not responding or relapsing shortly afterwards should be investigated.

In the prophylaxis of haemorrhage from stress ulceration in seriously ill patients or the prophylaxis of recurrent haemorrhage in patients bleeding from peptic ulceration, treatment with Zantac Tablets 150 mg twice daily may be substituted for Zantac Injection (see separate SPC) once oral feeding commences in patients considered to be still at risk from these conditions.

Prophylaxis of acid aspiration (Mendleson's syndrome):

In patients thought to be at risk of acid aspiration syndrome an oral dose of 150 mg can be given 2 hours before induction of general anaesthesia, and preferably also 150 mg the previous evening.

In obstetric patients at commencement of labour, an oral dose of 150 mg may be given followed by 150 mg at six hourly intervals.

It is recommended that since gastric emptying and drug absorption are delayed during labour, any patient requiring emergency general anaesthesia should be given, in addition, a non-particulate antacid (e.g.

sodium citrate) prior to induction of anaesthesia. The usual precautions to avoid acid aspiration should also be taken.

Children 12 years and over

For children 12 years and over the adult dosage is given.

Children from 3 to 11 years and over 30 kg of weight

See section 5.2 Pharmacokinetic properties (Other special populations)

Patients over 50 years of age

See section 5.2 Pharmacokinetic properties (Other special Populations )

Peptic Ulcer Acute Treatment

The recommended oral dose for treatment of peptic ulcer in children is 4 mg/kg/day to 8 mg/kg/day administered as two divided doses to a maximum of 300 mg ranitidine per day for a duration of 4 weeks. For those patients with incomplete healing, another 4 weeks of therapy is indicated, as healing usually occurs after eight weeks of treatment.

Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux

The recommended oral dose for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children is 5 mg/kg/day to 10 mg/kg/day administered as two divided doses to a maximum of 600 mg (the maximum dose is ly to apply to heavier children or adolescents with severe symptoms).

Neonates

Safety and efficacy in new-born patients has not been established.

Patients with renal impairment

Accumulation of ranitidine with resulting elevated plasma concentrations will occur in patients with renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than 50 ml/min).

Accordingly, it is recommended that the daily dose of ranitidine in such patients should be 150 mg at night for 4-8 weeks. The same dose should be used for maintenance treatment, if necessary.

If an ulcer has not healed after treatment, 150 mg twice daily dosage should be instituted followed, if need be, by maintenance treatment of 150 mg at night.

Method of administration

For oral administration.

Hypersensitivity to the active substance or to any of the excipients listed in section 6.1.

Malignancy

The possibility of malignancy should be excluded before commencement of therapy in patients with gastric ulcer and in patients of middle age and over with new or recently changed dyspeptic symptoms) as treatment with ranitidine may mask symptoms of gastric carcinoma.

Renal Disease

Ranitidine is excreted via the kidney and so plasma levels of the drug are increased in patients with renal impairment. The dose should be adjusted as detailed in section 4.2 Patients with renal impairment.

Regular supervision of patients who are taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concomitantly with ranitidine is recommended, especially in the elderly. Current evidence shows that ranitidine protects against NSAID associated ulceration in the duodenum and not in the stomach.

Rare clinical reports suggest that ranitidine may precipitate acute porphyric attacks. Ranitidine should therefore be avoided in patients with a history of acute porphyria.

In patients such as the elderly, persons with chronic lung disease, diabetes or the immunocompromised, there may be an increased risk of developing community acquired pneumonia.

A large epidemiological study showed an increased risk of developing community acquired pneumonia in current users of ranitidine alone versus those who had stopped treatment, with an observed adjusted relative risk increase of 1.82 (95% CI 1.26-2.64).

Post-marketing data indicate reversible mental confusion, depression, and hallucinations have been reported most frequently in severely ill and elderly patients (see section 4.8).

Important information about excipients

This medicinal product contains less than 1 mmol sodium (23 mg) per dosage unit, that is to say essentially 'sodium-free'.

Ranitidine has the potential to affect the absorption, metabolism or renal excretion of other drugs. The altered pharmacokinetics may necessitate dosage adjustment of the affected drug or discontinuation of treatment

Interactions occur by several mechanisms including:

1) Inhibition of cytochrome P450-linked mixed function oxygenase system: Ranitidine at usual therapeutic doses does not potentiate the actions of drugs which are inactivated by this enzyme system such as diazepam, lidocaine, phenytoin, propranolol and theophylline.

There have been reports of altered prothrombin time with coumarin anticoagulants (e.g. warfarin). Due to the narrow therapeutic index, close monitoring of increased or decreased prothrombin time is recommended during concurrent treatment with ranitidine.

2) Competition for renal tubular secretion:

Since ranitidine is partially eliminated by the cationic system, it may affect the clearance of other drugs eliminated by this route. High doses of ranitidine (e.g. such as those used in the treatment of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome) may reduce the excretion of procainamide and N-acetylprocainamide resulting in increased plasma level of these drugs.

3) Alteration of gastric pH:

The bioavailability of certain drugs may be affected. This can result in either an increase in absorption (e.g. triazolam, midazolam, glipizide) or a decrease in absorption (e.g. ketoconazole, atazanavir, delavirdine, gefitinib).

Concomitant administration of 300 mg ranitidine and erlotinib decreased erlotinib exposure [AUC] and maximum concentrations [Cmax] by 33% and 54%, respectively. However, when erlotinib was dosed in a staggered manner 2 hours before or 10 hours after ranitidine 150 mg b.i.d., erlotinib exposure [AUC] and maximum concentrations [Cmax] decreased only by 15% and 17%, respectively.

There is no evidence of an interaction between ranitidine and amoxicillin or metronidazole.

If high doses (2 g) of sucralfate are co-administered with ranitidine the absorption of the latter may be reduced. This effect is not seen if sucralfate is taken after an interval of 2 hours.

Pregnancy

Ranitidine crosses the placenta but therapeutic doses administered to obstetric patients in labour or undergoing caesarean section have been without any adverse effect on labour, delivery or subsequent neonatal progress. other drugs, ranitidine should only be used during pregnancy if considered essential.

Breast-feeding

Ranitidine is excreted in human breast milk. other drugs, ranitidine should only be used during breast-feeding if considered essential.

Fertility

There are no data on the effects of ranitidine on human fertility. There were no effects on male and female fertility in animal studies (see section 5.3).

The following convention has been utilised for the classification of undesirable effects: very common (≥1/10), common (≥1/100,

Source: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/220/smpc

Prevacid – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings and Interactions

Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions

Prevacid (lansoprazole) belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These are powerful heartburn drugs.

Other PPIs include Nexium, Prilosec and Protonix.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Prevacid in 1995. Prevacid is available in prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) versions.

Recent studies link Prevacid to several serious health risks, especially when taken long-term. Some of the risks associated with Prevacid can result in serious injury or death. These include kidney damage and cancer.

Patients have filed Prevacid lawsuits after suffering severe side effects.

People should speak with their doctors before starting or stopping Prevacid.

Prevacid treats certain problems related to excess stomach acid. It is generally intended for short-term use — anywhere from 10 days to 12 weeks. But patients sometimes use it for longer periods of time.

Ulcers are open sores in the lining of the stomach.FDA Approved Prevacid Uses

  • Treating and maintaining duodenal ulcers
  • Certain gastric ulcer treatments
  • Treating symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Treatment and maintenance of erosive esophagitis (EE)
  • Treating Zollenger-Ellison syndrome and other hypersecretory conditions
  • H. pylori treatment

Prevacid is not meant for quick relief of heartburn. It takes up to four days to relieve symptoms.

Lansoprazole is the active ingredient in Prevacid. It is not effective at treating symptomatic GERD in infants.

Prevacid decreases the amount of acid in the stomach. It blocks an enzyme in the stomach wall responsible for producing the acid. This prevents proton pumps in the stomach from releasing acid.

Decreased stomach acid gives the stomach and esophagus time to heal. It also prevents further damage and complications. This can prevent ulcers from developing or recurring.

Prevacid is a PPI, Nexium and Prilosec. PPIs differ from H2 blockers Zantac and Pepcid.

Both types of medication prevent the stomach from producing too much acid. But they do it in different ways.

Prevacid affects tiny proton pumps that generate acid through a chemical process. Zantac prevents acid-producing cells from responding to histamines in the stomach.

Zantac is advertised to work in as little as 30 minutes. Prevacid can take days and multiple doses to take effect.

Learn more about possible alternatives to PPIs Prevacid

Studies have linked Prevacid and other PPIs to several serious side effects. PPI side effects are most common with long-term use lasting a year or more.

The FDA has issued several Prevacid warnings since 2010.

Prevacid Warnings Include:

  • Osteoporosis and fractures of the hip, wrist and spine
  • Low magnesium levels
  • Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (severe diarrhea that can contain blood or pus)
  • Kidney disease and kidney failure due to acute interstitial nephritis (AIN)
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Lupus erythematosus (autoimmune disease)

Short-term Prevacid use does not usually cause side effects. When side effects do occur, they are typically mild.

Side effects people should ask their doctors about include abnormal heartbeat, muscle pain, leg cramps, weakness and nervousness. Other side effects may be more common.

People who suffered kidney problems have filed Prevacid lawsuits. As of July 2019, there were 12,775 pending lawsuits over several different PPIs.

A federal panel combined the lawsuits in a multidistrict litigation. MDLs allow several similar lawsuits to move more quickly through the legal process. The cases are in New Jersey federal court.

Injuries Claimed in Prevacid Lawsuits

  • Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN)
  • Kidney disease
  • Kidney failure
  • Kidney injury

Lawsuit Information Multiple lawsuits claim Prevacid and other proton pump inhibitors caused serious side effects that led to kidney disease and failure. Read more about currently pending litigation.View Lawsuits

People take Prevacid orally. It is available in delayed-release capsules and delayed-release orally disintegrating tablets.

Patients can swallow the delayed-release capsules whole. People place the disintegrating tablets on the tongue and allow them to dissolve with or without water.

Patients should take either version before a meal. People should not crush either form of the medicine.

Prevacid comes in several forms. Over-the-counter and generic prescription versions are available. There are also store brand equivalents. All forms contain the same active ingredient, lansoprazole.

Available Prevacid Versions and EquivalentsPrevacidPrescription brand-name for lansoprazole; available in capsule formPrevacid SoluTabPrescription version of Prevacid designed to dissolve; available for suspension in liquids and as a tablet that dissolves in the mouthPrevacid 24HROver-the-counter (OTC) version of PrevacidGeneric lansoprazoleGeneric prescription versionsStore brandsIncludes Heartburn Relief 24 Hour and Heartburn Treatment 24 Hour; comparable to Prevacid 24HR

Prescription Prevacid versions come in both 15 mg and 30 mg pills. Prevacid 24 HR comes in 15 mg pills.

Dosages can vary the condition Prevacid treats. Doctors may also consider the age and weight of the patient. Doctors may adjust the dosage depending on the patient’s other health conditions.

The recommended daily dosage of Prevacid in people with liver disease is 15 mg.

Recommended Prevacid Doses for Adults

Condition Being Treated Recommended DoseTaken How Often & How Long
Duodenal ulcers15 mgOnce daily for 8 weeks for short-term treatment Once daily for maintenance of healed ulcer
Eradication of H. pylori bacteria – Triple therapy30 mg (Prevacid)1 gram (Amoxicillin)500 mg (Clarithromycin)Twice daily for 10 to 14 days
Benign gastric ulcer30 mgOnce daily for up to 8 weeks for short-term treatment
NSAID-associated gastric ulcer30 mg or 15 mgOnce daily for 8 weeks for healingOnce daily for up to 12 weeks for risk reduction
GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease)15 mg or 30 mgOnce a day for up to 8 weeks for short-term treatment of symptomatic GERDOnce a day for up to 8 weeks for short-term treatment of erosive esophagitis (EE)
Maintenance of healing of erosive esophagitis (EE)15 mgOnce a day (controlled studies did not go beyond 12 weeks of treatment)
Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome60 mgOnce daily (doses and length of time of treatment can vary per patient)

Recommended Prevacid Doses for Children

Condition Being Treated Recommended DoseTaken How Often & How Long
Short-term treatment of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis (EE) (ages 1 to 11)15 mg for kids weighing under 30 kg30 mg for those weighing more than 30 kg 15 mg for kids weighing under 30 kg30 mg for those weighing more than 30 kgOnce a day for up to 12 weeks
Short-term treatment of symptomatic GERD (ages 12 to 17)15 mg (non-erosive GERD) 30 mg (erosive esophagitis)Once daily for up to 8 weeks

Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Several recent studies have associated side effects with PPI use in infants. A 2017 study found Prevacid given before a child’s first birthday increased bone fracture risks. And a 2018 study found PPIs taken in infancy can lead to childhood allergies.

It may be possible to overdose on Prevacid. But a case study found a person who took 20 times the adult dose suffered no adverse reactions.

Tests on rats and mice found no relative overdose risk at 1,300 times the adult dose. Overdose symptoms may include passing out or trouble breathing.

“If over-exposure occurs, call your poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 for current information on the management of poisoning or over-exposure. ”

If a person misses a Prevacid dose, he or she should take a dose as soon as possible. If the person is nearing the time for the next dose, he or she may wait until the next scheduled time.

Prevacid is available by prescription or over-the-counter (OTC). Prevacid 24HR is the non-prescription version.

Studies have found that Prevacid 24HR often works as well as prescription Prevacid. Prevacid 24HR is only available in a 15 mg dose.

People can take one Prevacid 24HR 15 mg pill daily for 14 days. Prevacid 24HR users should not take the drug for more than 14 days. They should wait at least four months before taking Prevacid 24HR again.

People who are allergic to lansoprazole should not take Prevacid. People allergic to any other PPI or other Prevacid ingredient should avoid it.

Ingredients vary with each Prevacid version. Check label ingredients for allergies before taking Prevacid.

Patients with PKE should talk with their doctor before taking Prevacid SoluTabs.People Should Talk with Their Doctor Before Taking Prevacid If They Have:

  • Low blood magnesium
  • Liver disease
  • Lupus
  • Allergies to any PPI or PPI ingredient
  • Phenylketonuria (PKE)

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should consult their doctor before taking Prevacid or any other medication.

Prevacid interactions can happen with 290 other drugs or dietary supplements. People should tell their doctor what drugs they take before starting Prevacid.

Some Prevacid interactions can happen with things as common as aspirin or fish oil.

Prevacid Drug Interactions

DrugSide Effect
HIV Antiretrovirals (including rilpivirine, atazanavir, delavirdine and nelfinavir)Decreases or increases drug effects
WarfarinIncreases risk of bleeding or death
MethotrexateCan lead to methotrexate toxicity
DigoxinIncreased exposure
TheophyllineIncreases clearance of theophylline
Drugs dependent on gastric pH for absorption (iron salts)Reduces absorption
Antibiotics (clarithromycin and amoxicillin)Possible serious adverse reactions, including potentially fatal arrhythmias
TacrolimusIncreases drug’s effects
CYP2C19 or CYP3A4 inducers (St. John’s Wort, rifampin and Ritonavir-containing products)Decreases Prevacid effects
CYP2C19 or CYP3A4 inhibitors (voriconazole)Increases Prevacid effects
SucralfateDecreases and delays Prevacid absorption
Clopidogrel (Plavix)Decreases effectiveness of Plavix, can increase heart attack risk
AminophyllineMay increase aminophylline levels by slowing metabolism, may result in aminophylline toxicity in extremely high doses (interaction is unly and effects are minor)

Source: https://www.drugwatch.com/proton-pump-inhibitors/prevacid/

Ranitidine (Zantac): Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings

Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions

Ranitidine is a prescription drug used to treat ulcers of the stomach and intestines and to prevent intestinal ulcers from coming back after they have healed.

Ranitidine is also used to treat certain stomach and throat problems such as erosive esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It works by decreasing the amount of acid your stomach makes.

It relieves symptoms such as cough that doesn't go away, stomach pain, heartburn, and difficulty swallowing. Ranitidine belongs to a class of drugs known as H2 blockers.

Ranitidine is available under the following different brand names: Zantac, Zantac 150 Maximum Strength, and Zantac 75.

Dosages of Ranitidine

Adult and pediatric dosages:

Injection solution

Syrup

Tablet

Dosage Considerations — Should Be Given As Follows:

Adult Dosage Considerations

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

  • 150 mg orally every 12 hours or 50 mg intramuscular/intravenously every 6-8 hours

Gastric Ulcer, Benign

  • Treatment: 150 mg orally every 6 hours or 50 mg intermuscular/intravenously every 6-8 hours intermittent bolus or infusion; alternatively, 6.25 mg/hours intravenously by continuous infusion
  • Maintenance of healing: 150 mg orally every 12 hours

Hypersecretory Conditions

  • 150 mg orally every 12 hours, up to 6 g/day used
  • Parenteral: 50 mg (2 mL) intramuscularly or intermittent intravenous bolus or infusion every 6-8 hours, not to exceed 400 mg/day; alternatively, 6.25 mg/hour continuous infusion

Dosing Considerations

More frequent doses may be necessary, individualize dosage, and continue as long as indicated; dosages up to 6 g/day have been used for severe disease.

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: Start intravenous infusion at 1 mg/kg/hour, then adjust upward in 0.5 mg/kg/hour increments according to gastric acid output (not to exceed 2.5 mg/kg/hour or 220 mg/hour.

Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis (Off-label)

  • 150 mg orally or nasogastric every 12 hours
  • 50 mg (2 mL) intramuscular or intermittent intravenous bolus or infusion every 6-8 hours, not to exceed 400 mg/day; alternatively, 6.25 mg/hour continuous infusion

Dosing Modifications

  • Renal impairment (Creatinine clearance less than 50 mL/min): 50 mg intravenously/intramuscular every 18 to 24 hours or 150 mg orally once daily
  • Hepatic impairment: Dosage adjustment not necessary

Pediatric Dosage Considerations

Active Duodenal/Gastric Ulcer

  • Treatment: 4-8 mg/kg orally every 12 hours; not to exceed 300 mg/day
  • Maintenance: 2-4 mg/kg orally once daily; not to exceed 150 mg/day
  • Parenteral: 2-4 mg/kg/day intravenously divided every 6-8 hours; not to exceed 50 mg/dose or 200 mg/day

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

Children: 1 month – 16 years

  • 5-10 mg/kg/day orally divided every 12 hours; not to exceed 300 mg/day
  • Parenteral (Off-label): 2-4 mg/kg/day intravenously divided every 6-8 hours; not to exceed 50 mg/dose or 200 mg/day; alternatively, infusion at 1mg/kg/dose once followed by continuous infusion of 0.08-0.17 mg/kg/hour or 2-4 mg/kg/day

Erosive Esophagitis

Children: 1 month – 16 years

  • 5-10 mg/kg/day orally divided every 12 hours; not to exceed 300 mg/day
  • Parenteral (Off-label): 2-4 mg/kg/day intravenously divided every 6-8 hours; not to exceed 200 mg/day; alternatively, 1mg/kg/dose once followed by continuous infusion of 0.08-0.17 mg/kg/hour or 2-4 mg/kg/day

Neonates (Off-label)

Term Neonates (less than 29 days)

  • 2-4 mg/kg/day orally divided every 8-12 hours or 2 mg/kg/day intravenously divided every 8 hours

Prophylaxis against dexamethasone associated ulceration: 0.031-1.25 mg/kg/hour during dexamethasone therapy to maintain gastric pH greater than 4

Prophylaxis against stress ulceration: 2 mg/kg every 12 hours or 1.5 mg/kg intravenously every 8 hours; alternatively, 2 mg/kg over 10 min, followed by continuous infusion of 0.083 mg/kg/hour

Source: https://www.rxlist.com/consumer_ranitidine_zantac/drugs-condition.htm

Zantac Uses, Side Effects, Warnings & Recalls – Drugs.com

Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions

Generic Name: ranitidine (ra NI ti deen)
Brand Names:Zantac

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 26, 2019.

What is Zantac?

Zantac (ranitidine) belongs to a group of drugs called histamine-2 blockers. Ranitidine works by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces.

Zantac is used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines. It also treats conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Zantac is also used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

Important information

Using Zantac may increase your risk of developing pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, and coughing up green or yellow mucus. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing pneumonia.

Do not use Zantac if you are allergic to ranitidine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have kidney disease, liver disease, or porphyria.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical help if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Zantac granules and effervescent tablets must be dissolved in water before you take them. Your doctor may recommend an antacid to help relieve pain. Carefully follow your doctor's directions about the type of antacid to use, and when to use it.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach. It may take up to 8 weeks of using Zantac before your ulcer heals. For best results, keep using the medication as directed.

Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

Before using Zantac

Do not use Zantac if you are allergic to ranitidine.

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease; or
  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system).

Ranitidine is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Ranitidine passes into breast milk. Do not take Zantac without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Using ranitidine may increase your risk of developing pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, and coughing up green or yellow mucus. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing pneumonia.

Zantac effervescent tablets contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of ranitidine if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

How should I take Zantac?

Take Zantac exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your doctor may recommend an antacid to help relieve pain. Carefully follow your doctor's directions about the type of antacid to use, and when to use it.

Do not crush, chew, or break the effervescent tablet, and do not allow it to dissolve on your tongue. The 25-milligram effervescent tablet must be dissolved in at least 1 teaspoon of water before swallowing. The150-milligram effervescent tablet should be dissolved in 6 to 8 ounces of water.

Allow the effervescent tablet to dissolve completely in the water, and then drink the entire mixture. If you are giving this medicine to a child, you may draw the liquid mixture into a medicine dropper and empty the dropper into the child's mouth.

Zantac granules should be mixed with 6 to 8 ounces of water before drinking.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

It may take up to 8 weeks before your ulcer heals. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include lack of coordination, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid?

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach.

Stop using this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Zantac: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking Zantac and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • stomach pain, loss of appetite;
  • dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • fever, chills, cough with mucus, chest pain, feeling short of breath;
  • fast or slow heart rate;
  • easy bruising or bleeding; or
  • problems with your skin or hair.

Less common Zantac side effects may include:

  • headache (may be severe);
  • drowsiness, dizziness;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; or
  • swollen or tender breasts (in men);
  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain; or
  • diarrhea or constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Zantac?

Before taking Zantac, tell your doctor if you are taking triazolam (Halcion). You may not be able to use this medicine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs that can interact with ranitidine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 8.01 DDC.

  • How long does it take Zantac to work?

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Zantac 150 Capsule – Uses, Side-effects, Reviews, and Precautions

Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions
Your dose and how often you take Zantac 150 will depend on the following factors:

  • age
  • weight
  • patient's health
  • the health of the patient's liver
  • the health of the patient's kidneys
  • medicines recommended by the doctor
  • any other medicines being used
  • herbal supplements in use
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg) twice daily
  • Recommended: 2 to 4 mg/kg or 0.9 to 1.82 mg/lb/kg twice daily
  • Maximum: 300 mg/day
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) at bedtime.
  • Recommended: 2 to 4 mg/kg or 0.9 to 1.82 mg/lb/kg once daily
  • Maximum: 150 mg/day
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) twice a day. Dosages should be adjusted according to an individual patient's needs and therefore should be continued as long as clinically advisable. Dosages up to 6 g/day have been used in patients with severe disease
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) twice a day.
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) at bedtime
  • Recommended: 2 to 4 mg/kg or 0.90 to 1.81 mg/lb/kg once daily
  • Maximum: 150 mg/day
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) twice a day
  • Recommended: 5 to 10 mg/kg or 2.27 to 4.54 mg/lb/kg once a day, usually given as 2 divided doses
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) 4 times a day
  • Recommended: 5 to 10 mg/kg or 2.27 to 4.54 mg/lb/kg once a day, usually given as 2 divided doses
  • Recommended: 150 mg or 10 mL of syrup (2 teaspoonfuls of syrup equivalent to 150 mg of Zantac 150) twice a day.
  • Recommended: 150 mg twice daily for six weeks
  • Recommended: 150 mg twice daily
  • Recommended: 150 mg should be taken 2 hours before giving general anesthesia, and 150 mg the previous evening, In pregnant patients at beginning of labour, a dose of 150 mg may be given which is followed by 150 mg at an interval of six hours.
  • Recommended: 150 mg twice daily or 300 mg during bedtime for 8 weeks or if necessary 12 weeks.
  • Maximum: Patients with moderate to severe esophagitis, the dose for Zantac 150 may be increased to 150 mg daily four times up to 12 weeks.
  • Recommended: 2 to 4 mg/kg 0.90 to 1.82 mg/lb/kg twice daily
  • Maximum: 300 mg/day

1 month

To calculate the dosage for children please use the weight based dose calculator to calculate the appropriate dosage as per the weight of your child.

Strength: 150 mg, 300 mg, and 400 mg

Strength: 20 mg, 25mg and 150 mg

Strength: 25 mg/mL and 50 mg/50 mL

Strength: 25 mg

Strength: 15 mg/1ml

Strength: 150 mg and 300 mg

Strength: 15 mg, 15 mg/1ml, 50 mg, 75 mg, 75mg/5ml, and 150 mg/1ml

A missed dose should be taken as early as you remember it. However, if the time for the next dose is almost there, then the missed dose should be skipped, and the regular dosing schedule should be continued. Avoid taking a double dose to make up for a missed one.

If you have taken more than the recommended dose of Zantac 150, unabsorbed material from the gastrointestinal tract should be removed. Also, supportive therapy and clinical monitoring should be done.

If you use too much of this medicine, it could lead to dangerous levels of the medicine in your body. In such cases, symptoms of an overdose may include:

  • low blood pressure
  • walking difficulties (abnormalities of gait)

If you think you have overdosed on Zantac 150 Capsule, call a poison control center immediately. You can look up the poison control center information from the Poison Center Finder at TabletWise.com.

Source: https://www.tabletwise.com/us/zantac-150-capsule

Drugs & Medications

Zantac: Uses, Side Effects, Dosages, Precautions
Drugs & Medications

  • Uses
  • Side Effects
  • Precautions
  • Interactions
  • Overdose
  • Images
  • Uses
  • Side Effects
  • Precautions
  • Interactions
  • Overdose
  • Images

Uses

Ranitidine is used to treat ulcers of the stomach and intestines and prevent them from coming back after they have healed. This medication is also used to treat certain stomach and throat (esophagus) problems (such as erosive esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). It works by decreasing the amount of acid your stomach makes. It relieves symptoms such as cough that doesn't go away, stomach pain, heartburn, and difficulty swallowing. Ranitidine belongs to a class of drugs known as H2 blockers.

This drug has been withdrawn from the US market due to problems with safety. A possible cancer-causing impurity has been found in some ranitidine products.

Dissolve each dose in 6 to 8 ounces (180 to 240 milliliters) of water before drinking. Do not chew or swallow the tablets whole. Do not dissolve the tablets on the tongue.

After the tablet is completely dissolved in the water, drink the solution with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once or twice daily.

If you are taking this medication once daily, it is usually taken after the evening meal or before bedtime.

The dosage and length of treatment are your medical condition and response to therapy. In children, dosage may also be body weight. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. You may take other medications (e.g., antacids) for your condition as recommended by your doctor.

Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than prescribed. Do not stop taking this medication without your doctor's approval because this may delay healing of the ulcer.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

Side Effects

Headache, abdominal discomfort, nausea, vomiting and constipation may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, depression, nervousness, hallucinations), vision changes (e.g.

, blurred vision), easy bleeding/bruising, enlarged breasts, severe tiredness, fast/slow/irregular heartbeat, signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn't go away, fever, chills), severe stomach/abdominal pain, dark urine, yellowing eyes/skin.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US –

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-6002/zantac-150-efferdose-oral/details